Welcome, Parents. Watch this space! Occasionally, we want to hear your thoughts about a particular text or issue that has arisen in our class discussions. In the meantime, if you have any questions or concerns, email me at trueteacher25@hotmail.com. May Question. From Mr. McGonegal: Of your student's five essays this year, which do you think best represents the quality of his writing? Why? April Question. From Andre Lozano. How did you study during your high school years for an SAT or ACT test? McGonegal follow-up question: What do you think about the SAT/ACT as measures of student performance for college admissions purposes? March Question. The March question comes from Mike Dorsey. How do you feel about studying vocabulary? Why? What, in your opinion, is the best way to increase vocabulary? February Question. This one comes from Steve Debesse. Who, in your opinion, has been the most influential African American writer over the last hundred years? Why? January Question. This question comes from Dan Stakutis. Is there any particular song that makes you proud to be American? Or, is there a song you hear often that you think sums up what America is all about? Thanks! December Question. This question comes from Ryan Manning. Parents: if you ever read The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, what did you think of it? Please leave your name with your response and click "submit." Thank you! October Question. Thanks for your responses to our first question. The second one comes from Phillip Kloeber. What is your favorite American poem? (Can you quote a line or two and tell us why you like it?) September Question. This question comes from Mark Kilroy. Parents: what piece of American Literature is your favorite? Why? Please leave your name with your response and click "submit" when you are done. Thanks Date: 26 Sep 2001 Time: 00:58:50 Remote User: Comments One of my favorites is the short story The Telltale Heart by Edgar Allen Poe. I remember it because it was very different from the usual stories we had to read in English class 30 years ago! Liz McGonagle Date: 26 Sep 2001 Time: 01:47:49 Remote User: Comments I enjoy historical fiction. James Michener is one of my favorite American novelists. Centennial and Chesapeake are two of my favorites works. Dan Saunders Date: 26 Sep 2001 Time: 03:00:45 Remote User: Comments Tough choice but I have to go with Uncle Tom's Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe. It was a powerful and courageous work and it was written by a woman! Nancy Allen Date: 28 Sep 2001 Time: 01:10:47 Remote User: Comments A favorite novel of mine is Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston. This classic love story turned tragedy was written in the 1930s. In the years preceding this novel Ms. Hurston had written other novels under a male pen name. Unfortunately, she was compelled to do this in order to have her work published. Their Eyes Were Watching God is one of my favorites because it leaves the reader with a lasting impression consisting of vivid images and voices of characters that remain audible in ones mind for many years. I think the Southern dialect in which this book is written is what makes it a powerful piece of classic literature. However, this same language could also be viewed by others as the book's weakness for it does challenge a reader unfamiliar with this dialect. For a personal friend of mine this was the case. She in fact became so frustrated that she was unable to finish the book. Nevertheless, this brilliantly written story is worth the challenge! Parent of Ryan Samuels Doris Howell-Samuels Date: 23 Oct 2001 Time: 21:55:04 Remote User: Comments 1. Recently I have had the opportunity to read "Old Glory." I was truly impressed with the story the poem told. The implications have two meanings, I can't remember any exact lines. But there is a line about how it feels to be kicked when you are down and even though this happens it (the flag) forgives us. The poem was written many years ago and there-fore has proven the test of time. 2. I guess Huckleberry Finn would be my favorite. It tells the story of a youngster growing up. What amazes me about these types of books is that growing up is a difficult time in ones life, no matter what decade or century the story takes place in. The trials and tribulations of young adults are becoming Date: 24 Oct 2001 Time: 00:15:24 Remote User: Comments Question #1 My favorite book by an American author is th House of Mirth by Edith Wharton. I like it because it was extremely well-written, and Edith Wharton does an unbelievable job of describing the scenario of those times. Question #2 My favorite poem is The Raven by Edgar Allen Poe. I like it because it is very scary. "Quote the Raven nevermore" Carolyn Kelly Date: 24 Oct 2001 Time: 21:24:22 Remote User: Comments One of the latest books that I have read, is "X Liberis" by Anne Feddiman. I enjoyed the book so much that I read it once more. Mehnoosh Sabet Date: 24 Oct 2001 Time: 22:37:27 Remote User: Comments Kevin Durant Question #1 My favorite piece of American Literature is Catch 22 by Joseph Heller. Question #2 My favorite American Poem is Trees by Joyce Kilmer "I think that I shal never see a poem a lovely as a tree" Date: 24 Oct 2001 Time: 23:05:07 Remote User: Comments Richard Bernazzani 10/24/01 2. My favorite American Poem is "Tree", by Robert Frost. It is just an excellent poem. Date: 25 Oct 2001 Time: 00:05:50 Remote User: Comments Q#1. The Declaration of Independence. This is because it emphasizes on the liberty we acquired after being freed from British oppression. Q#2. I don't have a favorite, but i would probably say Phillis Wheatley. Date: 25 Oct 2001 Time: 00:08:01 Remote User: Comments Question #2: Robert Frost's "Nothing Gold Can Stay" is one of my favorite poems. I remember hearing it in the movie "The Outsiders" based on the book by S.E. Hinton. Ponny Boy recited the poem to Johnny when they were held up in an old church. It left an impression because Ponny Boy, a "greaser," was interested in poetry. Nature's first green is gold, Her hardest hue to hold. It reminds me to not take anything for granted. That beauty in life may be short lived. That a real appreciation for the good, makes the good that much better. Thanks for this opportunity to respond. Mrs. Dietzel Date: 25 Oct 2001 Time: 00:32:35 Remote User: Comments Jane Cunniffe Q. #1 My favorite American Literature selection is probably The Grapes of Wrath by Steinbeck. Although I read it a long time ago, it seems to stay with me. It is a very powerful novel. Q. #2 I have a hard time selecting one favorite poem by an American Poet, but since Robert Frost is a special poet who has many New England connections, I would have to choose The Road Not Taken. My fifth grade students are learning it by heart this month. Date: 25 Oct 2001 Time: 01:25:10 Remote User: Comments 1. The Big Fellow, by Frank O'Connor, offers a tremendous opportunity to learn about the life and times of the Irish Patriot, Michael Collins. Hopefully, the reader is left with a better understanding and appreciation of great man. 2. Digging, by Seamus Heaney "Bewteen my finger and my thumb The squat pen rests; as snug as a gun...." Joseph Murphy Date: 25 Oct 2001 Time: 23:45:16 Remote User: Comments One of my favorite American poems is "Old Ironsides," by Oliver Wendell Holmes. It was written about the frigate, USS Constitution, presently moored in the Charlestown Navy Yard. In 1830, the U.S. Government wanted to scrap 'Old Ironsides.' However, Holmes wrote this poem to attempt to save it from destruction. Fortunately, his poem worked. It brought attention to the plight of this historic ship. American children donated pennies to save 'Old Ironsides.' We, as Americans, should be proud that Holmes was able to save the ship. Furthermore, we, as Bostonians, are fortunate to have the ability to visit this monument whenever we wish. Jack Coyne Date: 26 Oct 2001 Time: 01:08:21 Remote User: Comments I am not too familiar with any particular poem, but Edgar Allen Poe has to be the all american poet(born in Boston in the early 1800's)and a well recognized poet of all time. p.s. Emily Dickinson has to be a favorite also! Date: 26 Oct 2001 Time: 12:44:11 Remote User: Comments "The Waste Land," by T.S. Eliot Eliot's masterwork is an organic poem that captures the fear and absurdity of modern life in the rhythms of many cultures. Like America itself, "The Waste Land" is a crazy-quilt of sound and meaning, drawing on many traditions, but at its core affirming the simple and enduring pleasures of life. Eliot wrote "These fragments I have shored against my ruins" in 1921. You can't read the same words today without thinking of the rubble of the World Trade Center and the impulse to get on with our lives in spite of the darkening clouds of terror on the horizon. Date: 29 Oct 2001 Time: 02:02:17 Remote User: Comments My favorite American poem is "America the Beutiful" by Katherine Lee Bates. She is from Massachusetts and her words always make me proud to be an American. -Ed McGonagle Date: 29 Oct 2001 Time: 02:56:59 Remote User: Comments My favorite poem would have to be the National Anthem. Esspecially now with all that is hapening to our country. Hearing the words and what they mean. Jenifer Whitworth Date: 29 Oct 2001 Time: 16:00:21 Remote User: Comments "On the Road" by Jack Kerouac The history of America is the history of migration -- both from foreign shores and here at home. Kerouac, a French-American writer, employs a jazz idiom to write about moving feet and spinning wheels, dim-lit clubs and the glory of the night. "On the Road," is typically American -- a condensed epic of cultural and physical border-crossings. Brian O'Connor Date: 02 Nov 2001 Time: 00:55:11 Remote User: Comments One book which I read a long time ago but have always considered a favorite was Tai-Pan by James Clavell. It was riveting and full of action. A recent book which I read was "Jack, Straight from the Gut", an autobiography by Jack Welch, former Chairman and CEO of GE. He grew up in Lowell,Ma and went on to become one of the most respected businessmen in the country. He remained true to his values and this set him apart in the corporate structure. Ed Daley Date: 13 Dec 2001 Time: 20:59:41 Remote User: Comments I have read Huck Finn and thought it was a very good book. It was not only humorous but very hard to put down. Jo-ann DeBesse Date: 14 Dec 2001 Time: 00:21:12 Remote User: Comments I am sorry to say this, but I have not had a chance to read the novel, Huckleberry Finn, but I am glad that my son, Franklin is currently engaged in reading this book. Lorna Onyango. Date: 14 Dec 2001 Time: 02:50:47 Remote User: Comments "Huckleberry Finn" is a classic book that should be read by all students. When I read it in school, I enjoyed it immensely. I envied the freedom and carefree attitudes of Huck and his friends. Jack Coyne Date: 14 Dec 2001 Time: 02:57:54 Remote User: Comments Huck Finn- An American classic- It has always been one of my favorites Peggy Adams Date: 14 Dec 2001 Time: 03:09:51 Remote User: Comments Although, it has been many years since I read The Adventures of Huck Finn, it is a timeless piece of work which I believe could be adapted to today's youth--------Mark Twain had a great ability to bring life to his characters. I'm sure every reader knows or knew of a similar individual .................Joseph Murphy Date: 15 Dec 2001 Time: 00:26:19 Remote User: Comments Although, I have never read the classic "Huckleberry Finn", my son tells me it is a magnificent book. So if I have a chance I will diffenetly read it. Behrooz M. Sabet Date: 18 Dec 2001 Time: 01:23:53 Remote User: Comments I often get this book confused with "The Adventures of Tom Sawyer" but I enjoyed them both. Huck was more of a free spirit and it was great watching him having fun and getting into trouble. Ed Daley Date: 24 Dec 2001 Time: 02:57:56 Remote User: Comments I read Huckleberry Finn and it is one of my favorite novels. I would love to be able to float through a long part of my life having interesting adventures and meeting remarkable people. Martin Cunniffe Date: 27 Dec 2001 Time: 17:12:56 Remote User: Comments Sorry I have never read Huckleberry Finn. Mrs. Burke Date: 02 Jan 2002 Time: 00:31:16 Remote User: Comments I read Huckleberry Finn in high school. I think I learned to appreciate it more as an adult. It gives a glimpse of American culture and a time gone by. Liz McGonagle Date: 09 Jan 2002 Time: 02:28:56 Remote User: Comments The song "God Bless America" makes me proud to be an American. Colleen Salmon Date: 09 Jan 2002 Time: 03:26:56 Remote User: Comments My name is Carolina Estevez and I am Nigel Monge's mother. A song imparticular that makes me proud to be an American is a new song by various artist called "Whats Going On". The song is a reamake of old time Marvin Gay. It brings people together and makes people feel like we really can get through this time of crisis. Date: 09 Jan 2002 Time: 04:38:21 Remote User: Comments A song that I think sums up what America is all about is our national Anthem. the words to the song mean a lot and tell a story about what our country went through. Jennifer Whitworth Date: 10 Jan 2002 Time: 03:59:35 Remote User: Comments This question comes from Dan Stakutis. Is there any particular song that makes you proud to be American? Or, is there a song you hear often that you think sums up what America is all about? Thanks! The song that makes most proud to be an American is by Lee Greenwood "God Blees The USA" Mark V Giardina Sr. Date: 10 Jan 2002 Time: 12:10:22 Remote User: Comments Susan O'Connor I read The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn when I was very young, and I remember being excited by the book. I enjoyed the book because of the boy's adventurous nature. He was a free spirit. It is the same feeling I get today when I read Harry Potter to my son, Jack. (not Liam!) Is there any particular song that makes me proud to be an American? One song that sticks out in my mind, is Smells Like Teen Spirit, by Kurt Cobain. The young man was a genius at conveying the teenage angst and alienation felt by so many of our young people. Problems can't be addressed unless they are brought to light. It may seem like an odd choice, but he, like other American artists, had the freedom to express himself in a unique way, which in all its individuality, is truly American. That isn't allowed to happen in many other countries, and I'm proud that it continues to happen here. Date: 11 Jan 2002 Time: 02:49:34 Remote User: Comments "God Bless America" has always been my favorite patriotic song. In elementary school, if my classmates and I could choose a song to sing after the Pledge of Allegiance we always picked "God Bless America". Dan Saunders, parent of Dave. Date: 11 Jan 2002 Time: 13:54:39 Remote User: Comments I think that the song that makes me proud to be an American is the American national anthem. This is because of the words contained in the song, and their implied meanings. Lorna Onyango. Date: 14 Jan 2002 Time: 03:23:00 Remote User: Comments In answer to Dan Stakutis's question, I suppose 'God Bless America' and 'America the Beautiful' are sources of National Pride for me and unlike 'The Star Spangled Banner', easily sung. As to what America is all about, a popular Neil Diamond song comes to mind which I believe is titled 'We're Coming to America' .......................Joseph Murphy '68 Date: 14 Jan 2002 Time: 23:09:14 Remote User: Comments The song that I feel makes me proud to be an American is the National Anthem. Every time that I'm watching a baseball game or a hockey game I listen to this song and just think how lucky I am. Lucky enough to live in a free country and not have to be told what I can do and what I can't do. It leaves me in awe everytime i hear that song. After hearing that song many times there is not a time that goes by that i do not get the chills. This song holds great value to me and many other of my fellow americans. Jack Mackie Date: 15 Jan 2002 Time: 04:48:07 Remote User: Comments When I listen to the song "America the Beautiful" an image of our country's pride and joy, and our right to be free is instilled in me, making me proud to be an American. Paul Stakutis Date: 17 Jan 2002 Time: 02:49:09 Remote User: Comments Cathy McLean The song the makes me proud of being an American is the Star Spangled Banner by F.S. Keys. Its what makes us who all of us are as Americans. Date: 18 Jan 2002 Time: 01:15:03 Remote User: Comments I think that the song that makes me proud to be an American is the American national anthem. The words in this song are wht Amrica is all about. Karen Ryan Date: 22 Jan 2002 Time: 10:41:16 Remote User: Comments The National Anthem has to get my vote. Attending a sporting event has become an even more special event since 9/11. You can feel the intense emotion of the crowd singing along and paying particular attention to the lyrics. Ed Daley Date: 31 Jan 2002 Time: 01:34:25 Remote User: Comments "America The Beautiful" would be my choice too. It really brings to mind a stirring visual image of our country and it is easy to sing too! Liz McGonagle Date: 01 Feb 2002 Time: 04:39:40 Remote User: Comments The song that I hear often, that I think best song that sums up what America is all about, is the song by James Taylor: "In my mind, I'm going to South Carolina..." This song reminds me about all the beauties that America has to offer. Behrooz M. Sabet Date: 05 Feb 2002 Time: 22:38:36 Remote User: Comments The song that makes me proud to be an American is God Bless America, because it conveys the true spirit of our great nation. Amy Dorsey Date: 11 Feb 2002 Time: 02:53:17 Remote User: Comments Jose L.Lozano W.E.B. Dubois has been one of my most influential African-American over the last hundred years because his writings have taken steps to right the wrongs in our society regarding civil rights. He was very influential to civil right leaders such as Martin Luther King and Medgar Evers. Not to mention the fact that he was raised in Great Barrington, Massachusetts. Date: 12 Feb 2002 Time: 19:55:36 Remote User: Comments I believe that Dr. King has been the most influential African American writer during the last century. Because his work motivated milions of peolple. and I think that a good writer should move his audiance emotionaly. Behrooz M. Sabet Date: 13 Feb 2002 Time: 20:12:45 Remote User: Comments My name is Carolina Estevez and I am Nigel Monges mom. The most influential African American writer over the last hundred years in my opinion is Mya Angelou. This is because in all of her peoms there is always a message to live by something you can relate to everyday life. Everytime I read her peotry feel happy and want to read more. Date: 17 Feb 2002 Time: 19:08:57 Remote User: Comments I think Woody Guthries "This land is my land" fits the bill. However you should listen to all of the songs verses and remember that it was originally intented as a protest as well as a testament to the country. T.Edmund Burke Date: 25 Feb 2002 Time: 01:05:57 Remote User: Comments I think that an influencial African American writer is Mya Angelo. She wrote many famous poems that have influenced people to do what is right. She always taled about things that you could compare with in everyday living. Date: 28 Feb 2002 Time: 23:38:09 Remote User: Comments While I have read many books, I do not recall ever being inclined to classify the race of the author and were it not for the photographs on jacket covers, I would probably never discover the sex or race of many of them. In addition, I find it extremely difficult to assess the idea of "most influential" as it would apply to any author, with or without designation as to race. Date: 06 Mar 2002 Time: 00:28:09 Remote User: Comments I think studying vocabulary is an important part of school work because it teaches students to use words that they would not normally use in regular conversation and forces them to become more articulate. I think the best way to increase vocabulary is to read. Amy Dorsey Date: 06 Mar 2002 Time: 23:41:53 Remote User: Comments I feel that vocabulary is very important to study. You should not limit yourself to the same words. People will think more highly of you if you have a big vocabulary. The best way in my opinion to increase your vocabulary is to have frequent vocbulary quizes, and spend some time each day and do some vocab work. Jennifer Whitworth Date: 09 Mar 2002 Time: 16:19:29 Remote User: Comments I believe that studying vocabulary in extremely important. This is true mainly because it is one of the major components of the SAT's. A wide vocabulary is also useful because when you meet new people you are often judged first on how well you speak. The best ways to learn vocabulary is by reading, as well as using words in sentences and other pieces of writing. Date: 09 Mar 2002 Time: 16:20:05 Remote User: Comments I believe that studying vocabulary in extremely important. This is true mainly because it is one of the major components of the SAT's. A wide vocabulary is also useful because when you meet new people you are often judged first on how well you speak. The best ways to learn vocabulary is by reading, as well as using words in sentences and other pieces of writing. Cathy McLean Date: 10 Mar 2002 Time: 02:14:34 Remote User: Comments "March Question" I feel great about studying vocabulary, for it is only through this study, that your speaking ability will become professional, mature and quite unique. In my opinion, the best way to increase your knowledge on vocabulary, is through reading magazines, newspapers, and novels, on a regular basis. An individuals vocabulary can further be enhanced, by practising proper and mature language, when faced with any particular conversation. Lorna Onyango. Date: 14 Mar 2002 Time: 00:57:49 Remote User: Comments Anh Nguyen Vocabulary is the most important part on the SAT. So I feel students should be able to have a good vocab source. I think the best way to study for vocab is to read and to use them everytime they could. Date: 15 Mar 2002 Time: 00:24:24 Remote User: Comments I feel that studying vocabulary is very important, especially with SAT's comming up. I tink that the best way to learn vocabulary is to see it in its context, thats how i learned it easiest. June Lee Date: 18 Mar 2002 Time: 23:46:23 Remote User: Comments ...........Although it is difficult to admit, many years ago at Catholic Memorial a Latin Teacher predicted that if we studied our Latin and learned the vocabulary, we would have an advantage in understanding the English language and be better able to express ourselves...........He was right..................While, I understand Latin is no longer a requirement, I would urge you to read, write and speak often................... You can increase your vocabulary in much the same way you can increase your batting average or your goal scoring.......PRACTICE Joseph Murphy '68 Date: 22 Mar 2002 Time: 12:16:20 Remote User: Comments As they say "you only have one chance to make a good first impression". Making sure it is a positive one will be improved with the ability to speak or write intelligently. Vocabulary is an important aspect of this. Good ways to improve vocabulary include reading, listening to informed people being interviewed on news programs, using new words in your own conversations. There are vocabulary quizzes that are offered in various magazines (Readers Digest is one) that are actually fun and give you the opportunity to review or be introduced to new words. Ed Daley Date: 28 Mar 2002 Time: 03:35:57 Remote User: Comments I think that studying vocab is a good opportunity for the kids to learn more words and it gets them ready for the S.A.T. Vocab can be hard but it is good in life. The best way to study vocabulary is to use flash cards. Patricia Donahue Date: 31 Mar 2002 Time: 22:15:10 Remote User: Comments I feel that by studing vocabulary, you are better off in society. Because it can help during a conversation. Although there are many ways in wich you can increase vocabulary, is to read a newspaper, and may be do the cross-word. Merhnoosh Sabet Date: 10 Apr 2002 Time: 03:26:57 Remote User: Comments I think studying vocabulary is very helpful...My personal method of grasping words that aren't familiar to me is by writing them several times on a blank sheet, therefore remembering their meaning. Jose Lozano 4/9/02 for March Question. Date: 10 Apr 2002 Time: 03:33:09 Remote User: Comments I studied the same manner as young people are doing today. The only exception is that few of us had the opportunity to obtain additional help from such tutoring entities as Kaplan and Princeton Review...The SAT/ACT as a measure for college admission is a great idea as long is supplemented with extracurricular activities, student interest, student persona, and other qualities a young person can bring to an institution of higher learning. Jose Lozano 4/09/02. Date: 10 Apr 2002 Time: 12:37:56 Remote User: Comments When I was going to High School we were not offered special courses to study for the SAT. Studying for the exam was done on your own. I don't think the ACT was even offered, I never took it anyway. The SAT was at least as important then as it is today. I think that a standard test given throughout the country is a fairly accurate measure of one's ability and gives the college a benchmark to judge all applicants on an equal basis. I think it accurately reflects a student's potential to do well. Ed Daley Date: 12 Apr 2002 Time: 13:08:02 Remote User: Comments The most anyone did to prepare for SAT's when I was in high school was look through the booklet and try a few sample questions. College should not overly rely on SAT's as a measure of student aptitude or as a prediction of future performance. Giving a specific and relatively low weight to SAT's is probably the best way to take them into account for admissions. Grades, activities, essays, and recommendations provide a far more accurate insight into a student's character and ambition. Brian O'Connor Date: 30 Apr 2002 Time: 01:45:30 Remote User: Comments the way that I studied for the sat was took extra classes and took it several times. the more that you take it the better you will get at it. In a sence I think that the SAT is not fair because some kids are not very good at standardized tests. It may hurt you from getting into the college that you might want to go to because you did not do god on the SAT. Jennifer Whitworth Date: 30 Apr 2002 Time: 13:48:49 Remote User: Comments My answer actually addresses the March and April questions both. I think a good vocabulary is extremely important as preparation for college and for life. The best way to increase your vocabulary is to read constantly. You need to read a wide variety of materials including history, fiction, poetry, newspapers and magazines. You need to surround yourself with people who speak well and appreciate a literary soul. I was getting ready for college in 1963 long before there were college test prep programs in place. Instead, in our English classes we read the classics and did a lot of writing. We had vocabulary study programs with weekly tests, much the way you do now. I remember my grandmother testing me on my vocabulary from her sick bed. She knew all the definitions of the words without looking at the answers. I was very impressed with her mental acuity at the age of eighty-eight! Colleges have been relying on the SAT test scores for years because it is an easy way to categorize applicants. The more discerning admissions officers know that the whole student should be considered. Your high school academic record, moral character and special interests and talents are among the factors used by colleges who care about the applicants and the make-up of the student body. Colleges also realize (or should) that high SAT scores only reflect students who have a left-brain learning style. There are many interested and talented students who don't test well but have a lot to offer to the student body. Students who work hard and show self-discipline in all areas will always do well. Jane Sheedy Cunniffe Date: 18 May 2002 Time: 01:51:51 Remote User: Comments Date: 18 May 2002 Time: 02:24:12 Remote User: Comments I do not recall any formalized approach to studying for the SAT's ........ and view them as an attempt to quantify what an individual has learned over many years of schooling.--------------- While it is readily conceded that standardized tests have their failings, I believe there must be some STANDARD threshold by which admission panels can determine the likelihood that an individual will be able to handle the college workload and is deserving of the opportunity. If utilized properly, and reviewed along with a student's entire record I believe they can be very helpful---I would not be surprised to learn that a sampling of the best and the brightest of our nation's college students received high SAT scores............. Joseph Murphy '68 Date: 29 May 2002 Time: 01:25:32 Remote User: Comments I think the Literature essay represents Andre's quality of writing. It illustrates how he has been able to appreciate the genre of writing. Although, my favorite is the origins essay! Jose L. Lozano Date: 03 Jun 2002 Time: 15:04:45 Remote User: Comments Number 5, the "Whiffle Ball" essay most impressed me as a demonstration of the kind of enthusiasm with which the assingment was received, and completed. I found it interesting, informative and entertaining.---------- Initially, upon learning of the topic, his brothers and I were more than a litle skeptical of what might result.------------------------ We were pleasantly surpised. Joseph Murphy '68 Date: 10 Jun 2002 Time: 12:46:41 Remote User: Comments Of Richard's essays I liked the first two best for subject, since they spoke of his heritage and passion. For form I liked the last as it showed his improvement in thought and construction. Ed Daley Have a great summer!