English 10: Writing Portfolio

   
   
Essay the first: Origins  
Essay the second: Literature  
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
 

Since I was little my father was great at every thing. There was nothing created he could not do. One thing he was exceptionally good at was fishing. I never saw him go out and not come back with a good- sized fish. No matter what kind of day it was he always was successful. Of course everyone has a bad day eventually. And on this day his amazing luck ran out. Through this story I learned that I am not the only person who makes mistakes.

Let me tell the story of my dads’ unfortunate fishing adventure. * We were up in New Hampshire for summer vacation, and we were staying at our summerhouse at Lake Winnepesaukee. During this trip my dad went fishing every morning. Finally, one morning he went fishing and he brought a lounge chair. After an hour of fishing, my dad took a break, and as he was walking away he laid his rod down on the chair with the line still in the water. He got ten feet when he heard a splash. The rod was gone. That whole day he searched in the water, but he never found the rod.* This unique story taught me a lot about my family and about me.

What I learned about my family was that everyone makes a mistake sometimes even when you are great at something. I also want to add my dad has not missed a fish since. The lesson I learned from this experience is that everyone encounters a weird situation, and my father is no exception. I learned that I am not the only one stuff happens to.

   
   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dear Robert Browning, I am writing to inform you that this year our text book is coming out with a new edition. So some of our writers who have been with this book all these years will not be in this year’s text. I am sorry to inform you, that you are one of the authors who won’t be included in this year’s edition. The reason you are not in this book is because, in my opinion you are kind of crazy and I am afraid the students reading this book will be disgusted and creeped out.

In Porphilia’s Lover, you talk about a girl your character loves and she doesn’t love him back so he kills her. In the Last Duchess he brags about killing his wife. So as you can see many readers would think you are crazy. I am not the only one who feels this way. Maxwell says, “that your writing is distasteful and rather creepy”, and Eileen Gillooly says, “That you make too many obscure references”. On that note you can see that I am not the only person who does not like your writing.

To wrap up what I said earlier your writing is too advanced boorish to be in a book for tenth grade students.

Sincerely, Pat Carr

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Do you like magic, ghosts and witches, or maybe even dragons. All of these are examples of superstition. Superstition can be about a fantastic creature, or it can be something that an athlete does before a big game. British literature for example contains a lot of different types of superstition. Some are very well known such as J. K. Rowlings, “Harry Potter”, while others are not as well known such as the adventures of the giant Finn MacCumhail – a legendary Irish folk hero, who I will be covering for this essay. In this essay I will sum up one of his adventures and explain what about this story that makes it superstitious.

The name of this story is “Finn and the Giants Causeway”. The story is about Finn’s rival Benanndonner, a Scottish giant. He hears about Finns great adventures so he travels to Ireland to take on Finn to prove he is the greatest giant of all. Finn hears about this and tears apart the mountains to make a cause way to Scotland. He then dressed up as a baby and when benanndonner showed up Finn bit off his hand. Benanndonner was so scared because if this is only a baby what would Finn be like.

 This story contains superstition because it is all about giants. Giants are legendary figures that are only found in myths and legends. Also not many stories have people ripping apart mountains with their bare hands.