English 10: Writing Portfolio

 

Catholic Memorial High School

 

2005-2006

   
   
   
   
   
Research  
   
Creative Writing  
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
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Dear Mathew Sweeney, My name is Pat Sweeney. I am from Catholic Memorial High School in Boston, MA. I had just finished reading British Contemporary authors, and your name showed up. I write to you because I want you to come to my school and teach about your writings.

I was looking for a poet because I love poetry, and especially your poetry. I have read part of one of your poems "Cuba Street." And part of it says," He yawns, climbs into his coffin-- onto stitched red satin-- and streches his white toes. 'Would you be a doll?' he whispers-- to a girl in a tubular dress." This section of your poem fascinates me. It really caught my eye. In some other poems, you like to use humor, and we had just learned about the humor in stories.

My class and I would appreciate it if you would come and talk to us. I really like your poems, and I wish you would teach them to us. If you do not come, we will not get the chance to read your poems. Thank you, and hope to see you soon!

Best regards, Patrick Sweeney

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   
   
   
   
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"Daughters of Erin" was written and composed by Thomas Moore. He was a poet, satirist, composer and musican of note. Much of his music was based on older Irish airs. He was the most paid in Ireland at that time with 3,000 pounds(money). This song has influenced many opera's in Ireland.

During the 1800s, when this song was made, many of the Irish turned to music as an inspiration. Thomas Moore was a big composer and,often, people would listen to his music. "Daughters of Erin" was about all of the women in Ireland. The women had tough lives in the 1800s. According to contemplator.com, Moore wrote this song to his mother. His mother wrote some lyrics to Moore's songs. But, this time was Moore's turn to wite a song without his mother's help.

This song also known as "We May Roam Through This World." The tune is first documented as Auld Bessy in 1788. It was later in the opera Harlequin Amulet (the Majic of Mona). About that time it was attributed to "Jackson of Cork" by a book of Country Dances by William Campbell. It also appeared in part two of Nathaniel Gow's four volume Complete Repository of the Original Scotch Slow Tunes.

In my opinion, "Daughters of Erin" has great lyrics to it.It has put a great affect on Ireland and their music. It has influenced young people to take up music.It has influenced me to listen to old music.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On February 23,2006, there was an arrest in a French "anti-Semitic" death. It was in Paris. Nairobi - Youssef Fofana, suspected head of the so-called 'Gang of Barbarians' gang that kidnapped, tortured and murdered a young Jewish man in Paris, was arrested in a working-class suburb of Abidjan, Ivory Coast on the 23rd. Fofana's arrest in the Abobo area of Ivory Coast's economic capital followed a massive manhunt by security forces.He did this because he wanted power over the Jewish man. He did not like the Jews and he thought the Jews were controlling everything, again.

Two French detectives are currently in Abidjan waiting for extradition formalities to be concluded and Fofana to be deported to France where he would stand trial, according to an Ivorian police official, speaking on condition of anonymity. The 25-year-old French citizen fled to his native Ivory Coast last week after allegedly leading the three-week torture ordeal that ended in the death of Ilan Halimi, a Jewish telephone salesman aged 23. The dying Halimi was found on February 13 in a suburb of Paris with burns and other signs of torture over 80 per cent of his body. He died shortly thereafter in hospital.

According to French police, he had been lured into a trap by an attractive young woman on January 21 and tortured for three weeks by a gang who had demanded a ransom of 450,000 euros (533,000 dollars) for his release from his family and a local rabbi. According to a judicial source, one of the suspects told investigators that Halimi had been targeted because 'Jews have money and they stick together.' French President Jacques Chirac and Prime Minister Dominique de Villepin were expected to attend a memorial service for Halimi later Thursday in Paris' main synagogue in a sign of support for the shocked French Jewish community, the largest in Western Europe.

Now were there other possible suspects? Yes, there were other suspects. But, Fofana did most of the work and planning. Seven people, including the woman who had trapped him, have been arrested for the crime.

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

No language has ever had more words than the English language. There are more than 8,000 English words in a regular dictionary. George Orwell once feared that English will get to the point where there is a massive amount of words. Out of those 8,000 or so words, I was inspired by the word "money."

The word "money," according to Word Net, means "a medium that can be exchanged for goods and services. In the American Heritage dictionary, it means "the official currency,coins, and negotiable paper notes by government." According to the Meriam Webster dictionary, "money" means "assets and property considered in terms of monetary vaule."

The Oxford English Dictionary is a great source to find your word and it's meaning. The first definition for "money" is "the current coin; metal stamped in pieces of portable form as a medium of exchange and measure of value"(1357). The second definition in the OED is "a particular coin or coinage"(1357). The third definition is " the official currency in any country appointed by the government"(1358).

It's usages in literature also come overtime. In 1330, Richard Brunne wrote "Chronicles." He uses the word in a sentence on page 238," Edward...wille wite certeyn, who scent has his mone." In 1859, George Eliot wrote "A Bede ix." It says," It's no use filling your pocket full of money if you've got a hole in the corner." The famous Shakespeare uses the word "money" in "Merchant V." On page 117, it says," You come to me, and you say, we would haue moneyes."

Articles also have the word "money" over time. The playstaion game "Hitman: Blood and Money" was a top seller in stores. Another example is "Inflation concerns as money supply soars at rapid growth rate." The third example is "Efforts of the brother to earn money for college." Even our own Boston Herald has the word "money" in it. It says, " Damon takes the money."

I have asked a few of 10th grade sophmores about the word "money". Kyle Tobin says," It is used to purchase stuff." Tommy Driscoll said, " Money is what we give to people in need." T.J Flaherty said, " Money is our currency." Finally, William Wilson himself said, " Money is something you fight for. It's like in our blood."

The reason I picked the word "money" is because I hear that word five times a day or even more than that. I hear it 24/7. Money is used everywhere and for everything. Money is so powerful that people would leave a city that they have grown up in all their life and move to another city to make more money.